Monday, July 06, 2020

Nickelodeon’s Nick News Returns With 'Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special', Hosted by Global Superstar Alicia Keys

Nick News Presents: Kids, Race, and Unity | Hosted By Alicia Keys



Hosted by Alicia Keys, Nick News talks with founders and leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement, offer tools for families to have constructive conversations about race, and highlights teen activists who are fighting racial injustice in Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special.

Nickelodeon’s Nick News Returns With Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special, Hosted by Global Superstar Alicia Keys

HOUR-LONG SPECIAL, AMPLIFYING YOUNG BLACK VOICES AND PROVIDING ANTI-RACISM RESOURCES FOR FAMILIES, PREMIERES MONDAY, JUNE 29, AT 7 P.M. (ET/PT)


Share it: @Nickelodeon #NickNews

HOLLYWOOD, Calif.--June 23, 2020--Nickelodeon’s heralded Nick News marks its return with a special hour-long presentation--Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special, premiering Monday, June 29, at 7 p.m. (ET/PT). Hosted by global superstar Alicia Keys, the program will amplify the voices and experiences of Black children across the country amid current events. The special will feature the leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement answering questions from real kids, offer tools for families to have constructive conversations about race and inclusivity, and highlight teen activists who are fighting racial injustice. Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special is the first of a series of Nick News specials that will air on Nickelodeon in the coming months.

Said Keys, “I’ve had a vision of a forum that can engage kids during this time and help to focus our attention on how they might be feeling, and this Nick News special is it! Talking about race can be sensitive and uncomfortable; and sometimes we try to protect our children from racism they are already experiencing. But honestly, there is no way around this topic if we want to move forward in any kind of meaningful way. What’s happening in the world is not just a problem for the Black community, it’s all of our problem and we ALL have to care about it in order to change it! This is such an important, vulnerable, honest and beautiful conversation, and I know many families may be searching for the right way to enter it. Let’s really deep dive together.”


Keys will lead a series of conversations with special guests, including: the co-founders of Black Lives Matter, Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi; 12-year-old singer and viral sensation, Keedron Bryant; Ibram X. Kendi, author of “Antiracist Baby;” Jade Fuller, Nya Collins, Zee Thomas, Kennedy Green, Emma Rose Smith and Mikayla Smith, the Nashville, Tenn., teens who founded Teens4Equality; social media star Tabitha Brown and her family; and family therapist, Dr. George James.

Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special will simulcast across Nickelodeon, TeenNick, and Nicktoons, and be available on Nickelodeon YouTube, Nick On Demand, the Nick App and the Nick Pluto TV channel following the premiere.

A discussion guide as well as anti-racism resources, made in partnership with The Conscious Kid and Dr. George James, will be available on nickhelps.com and Nickelodeon’s social channels following the premiere of the special.


Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special is executive produced by Fernita Wynn, and Emmy and Peabody Award-winner and CBS News producer Magalie Laguerre-Wilkinson, with Wynn also serving as showrunner. Paul J. Medford, Vice President, Unscripted, Current Series, and Luke Wahl, Vice President, Digital Studios serve as executive producers. Production of the special for Nickelodeon is overseen by Ashley Kaplan, Senior Vice President, Digital Studios.

Alicia Keys is a 15-time Grammy® Award-winning singer/songwriter/producer, an accomplished actress, a New York Times best-selling author, an entrepreneur and a powerful force in the world of philanthropy and in the global fight against HIV and AIDS. As a devoted and influential activist, in September 2014, Keys launched We Are Here, a movement that empowers the global community around a host of issues and initiatives building a better world where all people are heard, respected, equal, and treated with dignity. Alicia is also the co-founder of Keep a Child Alive (KCA), a non-profit organization that partners with grass-roots organizations to combat the physical, social, and economic impact of HIV on children, their families and their communities in Africa and India.

The original Nick News, created, written, and anchored by Linda Ellerbee, and produced by her company, Lucky Duck Productions, aired on Nickelodeon for 25 years, ending when Ellerbee retired in 2016. Nick News won 10 Emmys, a Peabody, a Columbia DuPont, and the prestigious Edward R. Murrow award for Journalistic Excellence, the first and only time it was given to a children’s program. Nick News was known for showing kids respect, the direct way it explained world events, especially the tough stuff—including 9/11, U.S. wars from the first Gulf War through The Iraqi Invasion, presidential politics, HIV-AIDS and Hurricane Katrina—and for always giving kids a voice and a safe place to question their world.

The return of Nick News follows Nickelodeon airing #KidsTogether: The Nickelodeon Town Hall, an hour-long special that offers a kid’s-eye view of life today amid COVID-19, in March 30. Hosted by actress and Kids' Choice Awards blimp recipient Kristen Bell (The Good Place, Frozen, Veronica Mars) and featuring a performance by Alicia Keys, the special directly addresses kids’ questions and concerns, including tips and insights from medical experts on ways to be healthy, and gives first-person accounts from kids and families around the country who are social distancing and making changes to their everyday lives and relationships.

Nickelodeon, now in its 41st year, is the number-one entertainment brand for kids. It has built a diverse, global business by putting kids first in everything it does. The brand includes television programming and production in the United States and around the world, plus consumer products, digital, location based experiences, publishing and feature films. For more information or artwork, visit http://www.nickpress.com. Nickelodeon and all related titles, characters and logos are trademarks of ViacomCBS Inc. (Nasdaq: VIACA, VIAC).

###

Updates:

6/26 - Some famous names have signed on to appear on Nick News' latest special! ET has revealed that Chance the Rapper, Simone Biles, Naomi Campbell and Lay Lay will all appear on Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special later this month.

Alicia Keys is set to host the virtual event, which will focus on the protests and social movements sweeping the nation in an effort to "amplify the voices and experiences of Black kids across the country amid current events."

The special feature young activists like 12-year-old Keedron Bryant, as well as leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement -- Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi -- the latter of whom will be answering questions submitted by kids.




From Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

Milwaukee family participates in Alicia Keys' 'Kids, Race and Unity' special on Nickelodeon

The Kids for Peace Protesters are shown in a Facebook post this month. | Kids for Peace Protesters

A group of young Milwaukee activists and cousins is participating in a Black Lives Matter Nickelodeon special hosted by Alicia Keys.

The Nick News special, called "Kids, Race and Unity," will air Monday at 6 p.m. It aims to amplify the voices of Black children nationwide and provide anti-racist resources to families. It will feature conversations with guests including the founders of Teens4Equality in Nashville, Tik Tok star Tabitha Brown and the co-founders of Black Lives Matter.

Milwaukee siblings Avarie Scales, 9, Lance "Junior" Scales, 12, Kaleya Robinson, 15, and cousin Sariah Tyler, 11, have been organizing for Black Lives Matter throughout the month. They were invited to participate in a Zoom call, which was filmed as part of the special — and yes, they got to talk to Alicia Keys.

Along with other siblings and friends, the group calls itself Kids for Peace Protesters. It all started when they got caught in traffic caused by protests on the way to Target.

When they made it back home, Sariah said, they realized they wanted to get involved.

"Everyone should have a voice," she said.

These days, the cousins host protests outside, mostly at their homes and their grandparents', where they hold signs, hand out snacks and encourage passers-by to dance with them — what they call "bust a move for the movement."

Junior said the dancing is one of his favorite parts of protesting, remembering a moment in which a man got out of his car to dance in the middle of the street. He said that people who stop at their protests say thank you, and sometimes ask questions.

"Just because you're a kid doesn't mean that you can't make a difference," he said.

Sibling Lulee Alvarez, 4, said she liked it when drivers honked their horns in support. "It makes me smile," she said.

On Sunday, the cousins will speak at the Youth and Families March for Black Lives Matter in Milwaukee. They plan to watch the Nick News special together the next day, at Sariah's grandmother's house.

###

From DigMB:

Two 'Pop The Bubble' Kid Speakers To Be Featured On Nickelodeon

The "Pop the Bubble on Racism" kids' rally in Manhattan Beach drew eloquent kid speakers. Now two of them will be featured on a Nickelodeon special on race and inclusivity.

Claudia Yvonne Chavez, 11, and Noah Francois, 12, will be two of the young voices featured on a new Nickelodeon show, Kids, Race, and Unity: A Nick News Special, to air on Monday, June 29, at 7:00 p.m.

The show features singer Alicia Keys as the host. It aims to "amplify the voices and experiences of Black children across the country amid current events," according to a statement from Nickelodeon. It will include leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement answering questions from real kids, including Chavez and Francois.

Chavez and Francois grabbed national attention for their eloquent words at the June 6 "Pop the Bubble" rally in Manhattan Beach.

In his remarks at the rally, Francois said, "Black people are still facing racism and injustice every day. Some of my closest friends are white and their friendships mean the world to me. But these friends will never have the same fears I have. They will never hear about how their dad got beat up because of the color of his skin. They will never have the same fear when they get pulled over by a police officer. They will never have the feeling of someone being afraid of them because of race. We don't want my or any future generation to have those fears anymore."

Chavez talked at the rally about how her grandfather had led a sit-in that ultimately led to a Supreme Court case ruling that desegregated all restaurants in Louisiana. "Now all people of color can enter all restaurants, sit and have a meal. I feel that it is my generation's responsibility to continue his legacy and all those who fought for racial equally, justice and peace," she said.

Impact of Rally Continues

The "Pop the Bubble on Racism" rally drew between 500 and 1,000 people, which is far more than organizers had expected.

"We’ve had such a positive response to something that we thought was going to be a couple of moms," said Melissa Robinson-Chavez, Claudia's mother and one of the organizers of the Manhattan Beach rally. "It was very powerful for a lot of the kids who were there."

The rally featured a series of poised and confident young people who spoke eloquently in front of the crowd. Robinson-Chavez said that after the rally a Nickelodeon producer had reached out to her about the kids' speeches.
"I’m just so proud of these kids and what they've accomplished," said Robinson-Chavez.

Robinson-Chavez, along with co-organizers Melanie Barrows, Lisa Bennett, Lindsey Fox, and Nicole Spencer lead an organization called Pop The Bubble 2020. The organization aims to "empower children through education, empathy and action and replacing 'anti' behaviors and actions with compassion and acceptance."

The group is working on more events and partnerships to come forward in the next few months.

###

From CBS58:

Local family to appear on Nickelodeon special on race and protests; hosted by Alicia Keys

WEST ALLIS (CBS 58) -- A group of local kids are getting some national attention for their involvement in the protests.

[click here for video]

CBS 58 reported the story of the siblings and cousins at the height of the Black Lives Matter marches and their unique snack stand in solidarity. After the story aired, Nickelodeon reached out to the family.

“What Nickelodeon? We were so excited that it was just Nickelodeon and then later half way through the process we found out who would be interviewing them and it was like this whole next level of shock,” said Erin Homewood, parent.

The cable channel for children is airing an hour-long program, ‘Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special.’ It’ll be hosted by Grammy winner Alicia Keys.

The powerhouse singer interviewed the kids virtually about their stand. “She was really pretty. She was really nice too and she seemed like she supported us a lot too,” said 11-year-old Sariah Tyler.

The special will feature other young activists and discuss the experiences of Black children across the country, like 9-year-old Avarie Scales. “We told her all lives can’t matter until Black lives do.”

Alicia Keys also shared some encouraging words with the kids. “She said she loved what we’re doing and hopes that we keep doing it,” said Kaleya Robinson.

The special airs Monday June 29 on Nickelodeon at 6 p.m.

###

From Patch.com:

American Martyrs Student On Nickelodeon Special Tonight

"Race, Kids and Unity: A Nick News Special" airs 7 p.m. tonight.On it, two area kids join host Alicia Keyes and kids to talk about racism.

MANHATTAN BEACH, CA — When they stood in front of hundreds of people and spoke about their lives and racism, Noah Francois and Claudia Yvonne Chavez couldn't have known how far their words would spread. Now, on the heels of that powerful day, the two will be on Nickelodeon, with host Alicia Keyes, to add their voices to the conversation on racism and Black Lives Matter. The show, called "Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special," airs tonight at 7 p.m. and will repeat several times.

"I was so nervous to meet Alicia Keyes and didn't know what to expect," said Noah, who will be a 7th grader at American Martyrs School in Manhattan Beach in the fall. "But then when we talked, she made me feel really comfortable and we were just having a conversation. I was very glad to have my message reach more kids all over the country. I feel like, as kids, we can become the change that the world needs today."

"She asked us [Noah Francois and myself] many questions about our protest," said Claudia, who plays soccer Sand and Surf Soccer Club and Manhattan Beach/Hermosa Beach AYSO Region 18. "We discussed my grandfather and his sit-in at S. H. Kress in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. We discussed the need to make a change in schools to discuss racism year round and not just one month or one day a year. "

Noah, who is 12 and lives in Redondo Beach, and Claudia, who is 11 and attends school in RB, both were part of the "'Pop The Bubble' On Racism" Protest for Kids held in Manhattan Beach on June 6. Both spoke and marched, joined on at the base of the Manhattan Beach Pier and then the walk on The Strand by hundreds of adults and children. Claudia told MB Patch the idea for the protest and march came from Melanie Barrows, whose daughter Emma is her good friend. "She said that when George Floyd called for his mother, 'Every mother heard his cry.' Since my mom marched with her dad [as a young child], it was a quick and easy decision. We had to do this!" Claudia said.

Said Noah, "My mom knew one of the organizers and they were looking for kids to speak. So I said I wanted to speak and I wrote a speech and I practiced it a lot." In Noah's speech, he talked about when his dad got beat up by three white men but didn't tell Noah and his younger brother. "I think he wanted to shield us from the truth, to keep me safe and not scare me. He ended up telling me a few days before the speech and that made me want to speak up more and ask the kids to be different than what we see today. I shared it because racism is bad and too many people have experienced it, and it has even hit my family. I felt obligated to speak up also as one of the few Black kids in my community." Though he is one of the few Black kids in his community, Noah told MB Patch, "My friends see me as Noah; they don't see color." Noah said he has been at AMS for six years and loves it, but that "Sadly there are not many black children at AMS and I have been effected because of it. I was called the N word once but luckily my friends have always been there to stand up for me."

At the "'Pop the Bubble' On Racism" event when he took the bullhorn to speak, Noah was cool, calm and composed. "I was very nervous but when I walked in front of the crowd I felt the support and everybody was cheering and yelling my name. I felt empowered and obligated to share." Afterward, he "felt empowered because I was able to get my message across and there were hundreds of people there to support the kids there and black lives matter." In his lengthy speech, Noah made quite an impression. One of his dad's friends, sent it on to a friend's son who is an actor with a reach of 4.5 million followers and a Nickelodeon producer tracked Noah down for tonight's episode.

Claudia, whose mom was among the soccer moms who organized the MB protest event for kids, told MB Patch she has experienced racism. "I really did not know what it was at first. I asked myself, 'Why is this person being so mean to me, I don't understand.' 'Why are they calling me names?' Why do my parents have to get involved and why does my mom look so hurt?' There was a time when I saw my mother hurt by an email she received from someone in a organization. That email depicted a stereotypical Black person, which was not educational, uplifting or served any purpose. That the sender thought it was funny to make fun of a black person — it was very hurtful. My mom explained to me that this is a form of systemic racism. This is the way some people see all people of color and it is not right. I think the most important thing to realize is that kids are very aware when racism happens. They feel it. They may not understand it at first or when it is happening, but that feeling, that horrible feeling stays with you. We need to discuss racism and not be afraid to have these conversations," she said.

Of the day she delivered her words to a crowd of hundreds on June 6, Claudia said, "It felt amazing. I am honored to have had the chance as a kid to have a voice and speak up about such an important topic with the kids in my community. Because my friends Emma and Charlee were at my side, supporting me, I felt very comfortable. It was a powerful feeling, like 'Wow, people are listening to all of us kids.' The high point was seeing so many of my friends from school and my soccer teams, even coaches were there to support us. There were so many families from Manhattan Beach. The signs — you could tell that so many people took so much time to make really meaningful signs. Some of the signs were filled with so much emotion. So many little tiny kids. I am so proud of all the kids and families who came to the peaceful protest. I think every kid who was there will remember this event forever."

Claudia, too, was contacted by a producer from Nickelodeon after they saw video footage and pictures from the "'Pop The Bubble' on Racism" A Peaceful Protest" held in Manhattan Beach. "She asked if I would be interested in participating in a Nickelodeon Town Hall Special on Black Lives Matter. I thought this is a great opportunity to once again have a voice, continue the fight and support those who have been wronged by racism."

Claudia's family history is a proud one in which her grandfather marched in countless peaceful protests and played a major role in the Civil Rights Movement. Whe asked about that, Claudia said, "My Grandpere is quite a talker. He loves telling stories. There is never a dull moment. He was determined to educate me [I am his youngest grandchild] about the Civil Rights Movement, his time as a student marching with Martin Luther King, SNCC, CORE, SCLC and all these amazing groups and people who peacefully protested. Some of his stories are documented in books and lots of newspapers." Her mom remembers marching with her dad and now her mom has marched with her.

As for the Nickelodeon Special? "I can't thank the producers of Nickelodeon enough for bringing this much needed topic to light," said Claudia. "Giving kids a platform to speak against racism and to teach unity and kindness is absolutely incredible. They get it, they get us. I am honored."

###

Official Numerator press release via PR Newswire:

New Numerator Data Shows Which Brands Spend TV Ad Dollars on Racial Justice

NASCAR, P&G, Dove, YouTube Lead TV Racial Justice Messaging

CHICAGO, June 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Numerator, a data and tech company serving the market research space, is launching a new Social Equality and Awareness Flag enabling brands to track socially responsible ad messages as they are happening. The flag covers Gender Equality, Racial Equality, Socio-Economic Equality and Financial Equality topics.


Numerator is launching this capability in time to understand advertising support of the racial justice conversation that swept the country in June. While many brands actively engaged on social media, some brands have also allocated higher cost, high visibility TV advertising to racial justice messaging. Seven brands included racial justice messaging across the 24 months in 2018 and 2019. Brands featuring racial justice messaging tripled in the 30 days ending June 23, 2020 with 21 brands allocating TV creative and media spend to it. Note: for the purpose of this analysis, racial justice messaging is defined as including the terms Black Lives Matter, Racial Equality, Racism, Juneteenth, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and/or Ahmaud Arbery.

"While many brands were quick to take stands in social media, there has been less inclusion of racial justice messaging in high visibility TV campaigns," said Eric Belcher, CEO, Numerator. "While TV support of racial justice messaging tripled, it's still just 21 brands. Brands that have taken the immediate step of social media should anticipate that investment into broadcast creative and media spend supporting racial justice messages will grow."

Racial justice messaging and spend highlights for TV advertising from the period studied (30 days ending June 23, 2020, versus full year 2018 and 2019) include:

- TV ad spend carrying racial justice messages had a 5.5x increase to $1.6 million in the 30 days ending June 23rd, up from just $293,000 across the 24 months spanning 2018 and 2019.

- 21 brands shared racial justice messages in 30 days in 2020, triple the 7 brands across 2018 and 2019.

- 12 of the 21 brands were in the Entertainment / Media category -- likely indicating broadcasters allocated available inventory toward racial justice messaging.

- NASCAR accounted for 12.5% of all racial justice TV spend on June 14th alone, the day of the Dixie Vodka 400 race, with a signature ad running 46 times

- P&G, Dove and YouTube joined NASCAR as the largest spenders

- McDonald's broke out as the only QSR supporting this message

- 7 brands invested early in TV supporting racial justice (2018, 2019): Amazon, Credo Mobile, Girl Scouts, Huntington Bank, M&T Bank, Nickelodeon and YWCA

Brands are able to further understand messaging tied to specific terms (e.g., Black Lives Matter, Juneteenth) or by category such as advocacy and actions; holidays and events; and individual recognition, both of victims and advocates. TV advertising messaging for the 30 days ending June 23, 2020 breaks down as follows (with some ads covering multiple categories):

- 67% Advocacy & Action: Black Lives Matter, Donating to organizations, Names of victims of oppression

- 14% Holidays & Events: Juneteenth, Black History Month, March on Selma

- 19% Speaking out against Racism: Acknowledgement of the issue, Plans to educate on the topic, Empathy

About Numerator

Numerator is a data and tech company serving the market research space. Headquartered in Chicago, IL, Numerator has 1,600 employees worldwide. The company blends proprietary data with advanced technology to create unique insights for the market research industry that has been slow to change. The majority of Fortune 100 companies are Numerator clients.

###

From Kidscreen:

Fernita Wynn makes headlines with Nick News


Wynn took her years of experience creating content and news for grown-ups and gave it a kid- and lockdown-friendly lens for the Nickelodeon special Kids, Race and Unity.

There are moments in life when everything comes together. Years after she got her start working in broadcast journalism, Fernita Wynn (pictured, bottom) found herself chasing headlines once again when Nickelodeon revived Nick News with a new special addressing racism.

Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special premiered on June 29, with Wynn serving as showrunner and executive producer for the hour-long special.

In addition to news programs, Wynn’s resumé spans daytime talk shows and primetime specials. Before joining Nick, she served as supervising producer for two specials on OWN: The Oprah Winfrey Network. Wynn has also worked with Warner Bros., Sony Pictures Entertainment, FremantleMedia, ABC, BET and NBC.

Wynn knew her passion for current events and experience in producing authentic interviews could be used to highlight kids’ voices in a way that rarely figures into conversations many adults consider too mature for children.

Hosted by singer/songwriter/producer Alicia Keys, Kids, Race and Unity focused on the voices and experiences of Black children across the US. The special also featured leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement answering questions from real kids, and highlighted teen activists fighting against racial injustice.

“There has been content talking to kids about racism and the unrest, but not in a format like this,” says Wynn. “It’s always adults talking about how adults are dealing with things, and this was an opportunity to come up with a show that would let us hear children’s voices.”

Following its premiere, the special was made available on Nickelodeon’s YouTube channel, Nick On Demand, the Nick App and the Nick Pluto TV channel. Additionally, a discussion guide and anti-racism resources—put together in partnership with educational organization The Conscious Kid and family therapist Dr. George James—are available online and through Nick’s social channels.

It was crucial to work with these experts for the special, Wynn says, to ensure families have the resources they need to continue conversations about race that were sparked by the special. But too many talking heads would feel like another standard news show, which might not appeal to kids. This was especially a concern because the COVID-19 pandemic and ensuing quarantine meant all of the interviews had to be done virtually. Clips were pulled from social media in an effort to break up the interviews, as well as to illustrate some of the points being made in the special.

Aside from limiting what Wynn could do visually, the direct-to-camera interviews also made things difficult from a technical perspective. The team had to rely on each participant’s internet connection, and issues around lighting and camera quality had to be addressed on the fly. One of the interviews required subtitles due to difficulties with sound that simply couldn’t be fixed during filming.

In the end, Wynn knew the answer was always to bring the focus back to the kids.

“I wanted to make sure I didn’t dilute what was being discussed, but still did it in a way kids could understand,” says Wynn. “It was important to break [the issues] down for the kid audience, because they are making their mark and want to make change. If they’re going to be on the front lines, we need to arm them with information.”

Nick News originally aired from 1992 to 2015. Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special is the first in a series of Nick News specials set to air on Nickelodeon in the coming months. Wynn says she hopes to collaborate with Nickelodeon on upcoming specials. Bullying, in particular, is a topic she would like to tackle with the team.

“Bullying, and especially online bullying, is something many kids experience and may have experienced more being quarantined at home and spending more time on the computer,” she says. “I think it’s important to talk about the effects of bullying and how kids can help deter it.”

While Wynn hasn’t yet decided on her next project, it’s clear that more kid-focused content is on the horizon. She is particularly passionate about finding a project for young girls, specifically something that builds self-esteem and motivation.

And working with so many young activists using their talents to call for justice on the Nick News special also sparked an idea for a new kid-focused music series. For example, teen gospel singer Keedron Bryant was featured on Kids, Unity and Race after his song protesting the killing of Black people by police went viral. Wynn says working with him was inspiring, and that she hopes to incorporate her love for music into a future family-friendly effort.

“I’ve never had a chance to work on a show that highlights kids’ talents and their powerful voices. It would be heaven for me to be part of a show that focused on kids and music,” says Wynn.

###

From Business Insider:

Alicia Keys said her white mother was often mistaken for her manager when she started her career

- Singer Alicia Keys recently hosted a Nickelodeon special on racism.

- During the broadcast, Keys facilitated conversations with longtime activists and children who are now getting involved in the Black Lives Matter movement.

- Keys discussed racist incidents she’s faced and said that her white mother was often mistaken for her manager or babysitter when she first started performing.

During a recent Nickelodeon special on racism, singer Alicia Keys facilitated conversations about tough topics and talked about racism she’s experienced in her own life.

Keys welcomed seasoned activists to the broadcast, including the founders of the Black Lives Matter movement. She also talked to children who are just beginning to get involved in making change in their communities.

At one point in the broadcast, a girl named Josephine, whose parents are of mixed race, shared how people often make comments questioning her mother’s role in her life, because her mother has darker skin than hers. A classmate once asked Josephine if her mother was her babysitter, she said.

In response, the 15-time Grammy winner said that when she was first starting out in her career, people often mistook her mother, who’s white, for either her manager or her babysitter.

“That’s what I got a lot when I first started to perform,” Keys said.

Keys’ mother, Terria Joseph, was quick to correct anyone who thought she was employed by her daughter, Keys said.

Numerous times during the special, Keys encouraged the children to continue to hold people “accountable” who say something offensive, or who may sing a racial slur in a song.

Keys said she’s been thinking a lot about “speaking up and saying, ‘Hey that’s not cool, that really makes me feel uncomfortable,'” when someone makes a comment that’s offensive. She urged the children to have a conversation with their friends explaining why.

The host of the broadcast commended her young guests for different types of activism they’re engaging in – whether it’s attending protests, reading books about racism, or making TikTok videos to raise awareness.

Keys also said she opposes the use of the N-word, and tries to come up with ways to encourage people not to use it.

“I feel very strongly about the N-word,” Keys said. “I ask people to replace that word with ‘king’ or ‘brother.'”

###

From Scary Mommy:

Alicia Keys And Nickelodeon Team Up To Teach Kids About Race And Bias

Alicia Keys was joined by experts to help empower and enlighten families and kids — and guide some tough conversations

As our country continues to reckon with its deeply held racist beliefs and the systemic racism that’s alive and well today, many parents are wondering when they should start talking to their kids about race and racism. The answer is as soon as freaking possible, because kids live in this world and will witness and experience racism whether you talk to them about it or not. But for some white parents, those conversations are difficult. If you’ve been blinded by your privilege, you don’t know where to start. You have no excuse not to continue educating yourself, but in the meantime, Nickelodeon and Alicia Keys have teamed up to help start those conversations between parents and kids.

Keys hosted a Nick News special that aired last night. According to the network, the episode aimed “to empower, enlighten and spark a dialogue for healing.” During the special, Keys had conversations with Black kids about the racism they’ve faced.

Keys also talked to experts like a family therapist and a history expert, who helped provide context and advice.

The founders of the Black Lives Matter movement took questions from kids.

Simone Biles made an appearance.

It was truly a powerful special that didn’t back down from helping kids understand issues of race and bias, however hard that may be. Keys was an incredible host who listened to the kids who were invited to the table, and created a truly incredible resource that’s going to help countless kids and families navigate these kinds of conversations.

Nickelodeon has teased that more content like this may be coming later. In a tweet after the special aired, they wrote, “This is only the beginning,” and linked to a new webpage with resources for kids and parents who are struggling to talk not just about race and unity, but all the terrible things happening in the world. They also promoted their Declaration of Kids’ Rights, which was created by Nickelodeon in the ’90s but rings more true today than ever.

And this isn’t the first time Nickelodeon went all in on supporting Black lives. Earlier this month, the network went dark for eight minutes and 46 seconds to commemorate the life of George Floyd. That move prompted complaints from parents, who clearly need to sit down and watch the Nick News special on race and bias.

You can watch the entire Nick News special featuring Alicia Keys here, or [above].

###

From Red Tricycle:

Nick News Returns with “Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special” Hosted by Alicia Keys

Last night Alicia Keys teamed up with Nickelodeon for Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special. Keys was joined by experts to help families navigate these important discussions. During the broadcast Keys spoke with Black kids about the bias they have faced in their lives.

The special featured the leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement answering questions from real kids, offering tools for families to have constructive conversations about race and inclusivity and highlighted teen activists who are fighting racial injustice. Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special is the first of a series of Nick News specials that will air on Nickelodeon in the coming months.

Keys said, “I’ve had a vision of a forum that can engage kids during this time and help to focus our attention on how they might be feeling, and this Nick News special is it! Talking about race can be sensitive and uncomfortable; and sometimes we try to protect our children from racism they are already experiencing. But honestly, there is no way around this topic if we want to move forward in any kind of meaningful way. What’s happening in the world is not just a problem for the Black community, it’s all of our problem and we ALL have to care about it in order to change it! This is such an important, vulnerable, honest and beautiful conversation, and I know many families may be searching for the right way to enter it. Let’s really deep dive together.”

Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special was broadcast across Nickelodeon, TeenNick, and Nicktoons, and is now available on Nickelodeon YouTube, Nick On Demand, the Nick App and the Nick Pluto TV channel following the premiere.

A discussion guide as well as anti-racism resources, made in partnership with The Conscious Kid and Dr. George James, will be available on nickhelps.com and Nickelodeon’s social channels following the premiere of the special.

###

From E! News:

How Alicia Keys Hopes to Change the Use of Offensive Language in Music

In a new Nick News special, Alicia Keys reveals how she personally hopes to reduce the use of offensive music in songs on and off the radio. [...]

Alicia Keys knows the power of words.

As a Grammy winning artist, the "Girl on Fire" singer has moved pop culture fans with her unforgettable lyrics and messages. And because she is a mother of two, the musician also knows how much children look up to their elders.

So perhaps it's only fitting that Alicia decided to participate in Nickelodeon's special edition of Nick News that helps amplify young Black voices while also providing anti-racism resources for families.

When sitting down with a group of kids, Alicia asked if they ever had an experience where friends "used offensive language." When one young girl admitted to hearing friends say controversial words in songs, Alicia shared her perspective.

"One of the things I've been thinking about in my family and my friends as well is how important it is to hold each other accountable. What I mean by that is speaking up and saying, ‘Hey, that's not cool. That really makes me feel uncomfortable. I would like to explain to you why that makes me feel uncomfortable to me and as my friend, I'd love for you to consider not using that word,'" Alicia shared on Monday night's Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special.

Alicia continued, "Even as myself, I want to share that I feel very strongly about the N-word. I ask people to replace the word king for that word. Can you say king? Can you say brother? Even giving people another language to use."

Monday night's special is the first of a series of Nick News specials that will air on Nickelodeon in the coming months.

During this week's telecast, other familiar faces like Simone Biles and Naomi Campbell spoke to kids about never giving up on dreams and speaking up for what's right.

Chance the Rapper also helped try to explain the Black Lives Matter movement to a younger audience.

"Black Lives Matter: I'm sure you guys have been hearing that a lot lately, and maybe curious or had questions about what it means," the rapper shared. " Black Lives Matter means everybody will be treated fairly and it just means everyone will get a fair shot at life and pursuit of their own happiness and treated like a human being."

Chance continued, "So as you see all of these things happening in the world, just know that it's your parents fighting for a better world for you guys and wanting to reeducate ourselves as well as you guys on what it means to be a good person."

Gather your families around and watch the entire Nick News special on YouTube now.

###

From Clout News:

Alicia Keys Hosts Star-Studded Nickelodeon Racism News Special For Kids

Alicia Keys, singer-songwriter, hosted a Nick News special called Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special. Nickelodeon announced that the children’s program will premiere a special presentation on Monday. The program aimed at amplifying the voices and experiences of Black children across the US. The special comes amid nationwide demonstrations against systemic racism and police brutality. The Black Lives Matter Movement was reignited by the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody.

Alicia Keys, singer-songwriter, hosted a Nick News special called Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special. Nickelodeon announced that the children’s program will premiere a special presentation on Monday. The program aimed at amplifying the voices and experiences of Black children across the US. The special comes amid nationwide demonstrations against systemic racism and police brutality. The Black Lives Matter Movement was reignited by the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody.

Hosted by Grammy-winning singer Alicia Keys, the special featured Black children, teen activists fighting racial injustice and BLM movement leaders. They answered questions from kids and offered advice to families on how to have constructive conversations about race and inclusivity. The special was aired on the Nickelodeon TV channel, the Nick.co.uk website, Instagram TV, YouTube and the Nick Play app.

“We are going to hang out for the next hour and have an important conversation. A conversation on why so many people are upset,” Alicia Keys said. “Many of you may have questions, like why are people marching? Why are people screaming? ‘No Justice, No Peace.’ What can we do about police violence. ?”

“Talking about race can be sensitive and uncomfortable. Sometimes we try to protect our children from racism they are already experiencing. But honestly, there is no way around this topic if we want to move forward in any kind of meaningful way. What’s happening in the world is not just a problem for the Black community, it’s all of our problems and we ALL have to care about it in order to change it!” said Alicia Keys. “This is such an important, vulnerable, honest and beautiful conversation, and I know many families may be searching for the right way to enter it. Let’s really deep dive together.”

Star Studded Special

The Nick News special was star-studded and had a lot of guest appearances. The program focused on the voices of youth and their experiences with racism, including “Little Big Shots” star Keedron Bryant. His passionate performance about being a young Black man in today’s world went viral. “I’m so excited and thankful and grateful that I can spread my message out there. Black people can live on Earth and we can enjoy life without being afraid,” Bryant said.

Madison, a 13 year old girl, revealed she first experienced racism when she was called the N-word on a social media app. She asked the guests and founders of the BLM, Patrisse Khan-Cullors, Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi, what the movement stands for.

“There Is No Way That All Lives Matter”

Garza explained, “Black Lives Matter is really fighting for the dignity and humanity of Black communities all over the world.” Tometi added: “For us, Black Lives Matter is incredibly unifying. When we say ‘All lives matter,’ we’re actually denying what’s happening to Black people in particular. There is no way that all lives matter, given what happens to Black people on a daily basis.” Khan-Cullors encouraged kids to get involved in the movement by looking at what’s happening in their own hometowns. Alicia Keys added that it’s important to hold our friends accountable for their actions and words.

Author Ibram X. Kendi, who penned the best-selling books “How to Be an Antiracist” and “Antiracist Baby,” was also a special guest on the show. He broke down terms that many children may be hearing, including “ally,” “racial profiling” and “privilege.”

Kendi explained, “If you are that Black person and you walk into a store and somebody racially profiles you and thinks you are a criminal. Meanwhile, if you are a white person who walks into that same store, because of the color. because of your privilege, no one would look at you as a criminal.” Alicia Keys Joined in recommending a family book club as one way to start a discussion about race and racism with your parents.

The nick news special saw several celebrities making guest appearances and offering their words of encouragement throughout the special. Some big names included Olympic gymnast Simone Biles, musician Chance the Rapper, comedian Kevin Hart and supermodel Naomi Campbell.

Nickelodeon has been quite vocal about their support in the past as well. They showed support for the BLM movement following Floyd’s death by airing a commercial of breathing sounds with the words “I can’t breathe.” The commercial received mixed reviews and seemed to divide the audience. The move angered some parents, while others applauded it.

The network took to instagram earlier this month to post a message. “Nickelodeon is going off the air for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in support of justice, equality and human rights. We are all part of the change #BlackLivesMatter.”

The network also shared a Declaration of Kids’ Rights. “You have the right to be treated with equality, regardless of the color of your skin. You have the right to be protected from harm, injustice and hatred.”

###

From USA Today:

'Kids, Race and Unity': Alicia Keys hosts star-studded Nickelodeon racism special for kids

Monday night's "Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special" brought together "future leaders and activists" to amplify young Black voices and provide a "safe space" to discuss race.

One month after airing a controversial "I Can't Breathe" commercial in tribute of George Floyd, Nickelodeon broadcast an hour-long special hosted by Alicia Keys to answer kids' questions on the Black Lives Matter movement, racism and police brutality.

"We are going to hang out for the next hour and have an important conversation. A conversation on why so many people are upset," Keys said. "Many of you may have questions, like why are people marching? Why are people screaming, ‘No Justice, No Peace'? And what can we do about police violence?"

The special focused on the voices of youth and their experiences with racism, including "Little Big Shots" star Keedron Bryant, whose passionate performance about being a young Black man in today’s world went viral.

"I’m so excited and thankful and grateful that I can spread my message out there that Black people can live on Earth and we can enjoy life without being afraid," Bryant said.

Madison E., 13, who says she first experienced racism when she was called the N-word on a social media app, asked the founders of the Black Lives Matter – Patrisse Khan-Cullors, Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi – what the movement stands for.

"Black Lives Matter is really fighting for the dignity and humanity of Black communities all over the world," Garza said. Tometi added: "For us, Black Lives Matter is incredibly unifying, and when we say 'All lives matter,' we're actually denying what's happening to Black people in particular. … There is no way that all lives matter, given what happens to Black people on a daily basis."

Khan-Cullors encouraged kids to get involved in the movement by looking at what's happening in their own hometowns: "Start something on your own. Start your own organization, start your own collective. Meet with your friends. Sit with them and ask, ‘What do we want to do?’ ‘What do we want to fight for?'"

Keys added that it's important to hold our friends accountable for their actions and words.

Author Ibram X. Kendi, who penned the best-selling books "How to Be an Antiracist" and "Antiracist Baby," broke down terms that many children may be hearing, including "ally," "racial profiling" and "privilege."

"If you are that Black person and you walk in to a store and somebody racially profiles you and thinks you are a criminal," Kendi explained. "Meanwhile, if you are a white person who walks into that same store and because of the color, because of your privilege, no one would look at you as a criminal."

Keys, mother to sons Egypt, 9, and Genesis, 5, recommended a family book club as one way to start a discussion about race and racism with your parents.

Several celebrities offered words of encouragement throughout the the special, including Olympic gymnast Simone Biles, musician Chance the Rapper, comedian Kevin Hart and supermodel Naomi Campbell.

"You are the next generation. This next generation needs to be filled with love, positivity, inspiration, motivation, because of you guys," Hart said. "So to kill hate, we love. That’s how we kick the problems of today in the back of the head."

Campbell, the first black model to appear on the cover of French Vogue, encouraged kids to not let "people's ignorance intimidate" you, much like she didn't in the fashion industry.

"There will always be tough moments and challenges ahead, but you must strive to overcome them," Campbell said. "You have to believe in yourself. You have to always try 110% and then you have to use your voice to uplift each other and one another. Never give up on your dreams. You will get there. Always."

Biles, the most decorated American gymnast, urged young viewers to continue to "use your voice."

"We can only move ahead and fight against racism by doing so hand-in-hand," Biles said. "Let’s not break that chain. Keep the momentum going. … Don’t be silent. You guys are the future."

A day in the life of my quarantine: Read Naomi Campbell's diary

From Gucci to Prada, luxury fashion brands challenged to confront racist attitudes

Earlier this month, Nickelodeon showed support for the Black Lives Matter movement following Floyd's death by airing a commercial of breathing sounds with the words "I can't breathe." The move angered some parents, while others applauded it.

"Nickelodeon is going off the air for 8 minutes and 46 seconds in support of justice, equality and human rights," the network wrote on Instagram earlier this month, marking the amount of time a Minneapolis police officer knelt on Floyd's neck. "We are all part of the change #BlackLivesMatter."

The network also shared a Declaration of Kids' Rights, including, "You have the right to be treated with equality, regardless of the color of your skin" and "You have the right to be protected from harm, injustice and hatred."

Nickelodeon has continued to address social issues with their young audience through a "kids-eye view."

In March, Kristen Bell hosted a town hall that answered young people's questions about the coronavirus pandemic, shared how kids were making an impact during the health crisis and helped separate fact from fiction.

"This is weird," Bell said. "We've never experienced anything like this, not in your lifetime, not in mine, not even in my mom's."

"Yes, the world has hit a reset button, but resetting isn't all bad." she added. "We're being forced to look at the world and our friends and our family with more love and more gratitude. I think I needed a little reset on that. I think maybe we all did."

Nickelodeon also celebrated Pride Month in June by sharing a picture of the network's "LGBTQ+ community and their allies," including photos of SpongeBob SquarePants, Avatar Korra from "The Legend of Korra" and Michael D. Cohen from "Henry Danger."

###

More Nick: Nickelodeon and TIME Kick Off Search For One Extraordinary Young Leader to Receive First-Ever Kid of the Year Honor!

Originally published: Tuesday, June 23, 2020 at 16:05 BST.

Source: Business Wire.

Follow NickALive! on Twitter, Tumblr, Reddit, via RSS, on Instagram, and/or Facebook for the latest Nickelodeon News and Highlights!

No comments:

Post a Comment

Thank-you for leaving a comment. Please note that NickALive! is not an official Nickelodeon website, and that NickALive! can not pass any messages onto Nickelodeon or Nickelodeon Stars. All posts are moderated, and won't appear straight away.